Jump to Navigation

Costa Rica

Although explored by the Spanish early in the 16th century, initial attempts at colonizing Costa Rica proved unsuccessful due to a combination of factors, including disease from mosquito-infested swamps, brutal heat, resistance by natives, and pirate raids. It was not until 1563 that a permanent settlement of Cartago was established in the cooler, fertile central highlands. The area remained a colony for some two and a half centuries. In 1821, Costa Rica became one of several Central American provinces that jointly declared their independence from Spain. Two years later it joined the United Provinces of Central America, but this federation disintegrated in 1838, at which time Costa Rica proclaimed its sovereignty and independence. Since the late 19th century, only two brief periods of violence have marred the country's democratic development. In 1949, Costa Rica dissolved its armed forces. Although it still maintains a large agricultural sector, Costa Rica has expanded its economy to include strong technology and tourism industries. The standard of living is relatively high. Land ownership is widespread. 



  • Population: 4,755,234 (July 2014 est.)
  • Telephone main lines: 1.018 million (2012)
  • Mobile telephone subscribers: 6.151 million (2012)
  • Internet hosts: 147,258 (2012)
  • Internet users: 1.485 million (2009)
CIA World Factbook
Telecommunications equipment is communications or networking equipment with interface(s) to public network or wide area network (WAN) services. Common telecom network interfaces include T1/E1, ISDN BRI, ISDN PRI, ADSL, serial and analogue PSTN.

Compliance International can help you understand how the following approval requirements apply to your telecom equipment products:

Wireless and radio equipment covers any device with a radio transmitter. This includes mobile (GSM or CDMA) handsets, wireless LAN (WLAN) equipment such as Wi-Fi devices, Bluetooth devices, Zigbee devices, WiMAX devices, RFID equipment, contactless card readers, and a whole host of other products that incorporate some kind of RF transmitter.

Compliance International can help you understand how the following approval requirements apply to your wireless and radio equipment products:

Non-telecom ITE is any information technology equipment -- essentially any device with a microprocessor -- that has no telecommunications or radio interface. This includes products such as computer printers and monitors, as well as many types of local area network (LAN) equipment.

Compliance International can help you understand how the following approval requirements apply to your ITE products: